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Profitability Metrics and Profit Margins
Definitions, Meaning Explained, Example Calculations

 

Small business owners and large corporation shareholders, alike, take a keen interest in profitability metrics.

In private industry, profits represent the firm's reason for being.

What are Profitability Metrics?

Profitability metrics address questions about a company's financial performance and financial position such as these:

  • Is the company profitable? 
  • Does it make good use of assets, equities, and debt?
  • Is it producing value for shareholders?
  • Will the company survive and grow?

Business textbooks typically describe the highest level objective for profit-making companies as "Increasing owner value." Firms pursue this objective by earning profits. After a profitable period, they can use earnings to increase owner value in two ways:

  • Firstly, by paying dividends directly to shareholders.
  • Secondly, by adding the remaining profits to an equity item on the Balance sheet, Retained earnings.

In this sense, earning profits is a company's reason for being. And, this means that profitability metrics measure the firm's ability to reach its highest level objectives. As a result, analysts compare the firm's current Operating margin, for instance, to other companies, industry standards, or the firm's own margins in previous periods.

Profitability Metrics Belong to Two Groups.

  • Firstly, three important profitability metrics are margins. Each margin refers to earnings (profits) as a percentage of sales revenues.
  • Secondly, another four profitability metrics are also investment metrics. Each essentially compares the company's investments in assets and equities with its earnings from these investments.

Explaining Profitability Metrics in Context

Sections below define and illustrate seven popular profitability metrics. Each appears in context with related metrics and the business questions the metric addresses. Example calculations use figures from the sample Income statement, Balance sheet, and Statement of Retained Earnings also included below. Profitability metrics appearing below include the following:

Profitability Margins

  1. Gross Profit / Gross margin
  2. Operating Profit / Operating margin
  3. Net Profit on Sales / Profit margin

Profitability Investment Metrics

  1. Return on total assets
  2. ROCE Return on capital employed
  3. Return on equity ROE
  4. Earnings per share EPS

 

Contents

Related Topics


 

Profitability Metrics are Financial
Statement Metrics (Business Ratios)

Profitability metrics make up one metrics family, belonging to the larger group of financial metrics families known as financial statement metrics. Note, by the way, that some analysts refer to financial statement metrics simply as business ratios."

Common usage notwithstanding, not all of the mainstream financial statement metrics are actually ratios. The profitability metric Net profit, for example, is a difference, not a ratio, and the same is true of the liquidity metric, Working capital. However, each of the profitability margins and investment metrics below is truly a ratio, built from financial statement figures.

Financial statement metrics use data from company statements to assess a firm's financial performance for a given period, or its financial position at one point in time. These metrics take input data primarily from the four accounting statements in Exhibit 1: 

Exhibit 1. The firm's four financial statements provide most of the input data for profitability metrics.

What Purpose do Financial Statement Metrics Serve? Who Uses them?

The primary interested parties and users of financial statement metrics include:

  • Boards of directors and shareholder owners.
    These parties use profitability metrics for evaluating management performance.
  • Investors.
    Profitability metrics are of keen interest to those considering buying or selling stock or bonds in a company.
  • Company officers and high level managers.
    These parties turn to profitability metrics to identify company strengths, weaknesses, and targets for business objectives.

What are financial statement metrics families? What questions does each family address?

Mainstream financial statement metrics belong to six families. Metrics in each family attempt to address a specific kind of business question about the firm.

  • Profitability metrics (the subject of this article).
    Profitability metrics ask:
         Is the firm profitable?
         Does the firm earn acceptable margins?
         Is the firm earning good returns from its assets?
  • Activity and efficiency metrics.
    Activity metrics ask:
        Is the firm using resources efficiently?
  • Liquidity metrics.
    Liquidity metrics ask:
         Can the firm meet near term financial obligations?
  • Leverage metrics.
    Leverage metrics ask:
         How do creditors and owners share business risks and rewards?
  • Valuation metrics.
    Valuation metrics
    ask:
         What are the firm's prospects for future earnings?
  • Growth metrics.
    Growth metrics
    ask:
         Are revenues, profits, and market share growing at acceptable rates?

Sections below define, explain, and calculate profitability metrics. Links above for other metrics families lead to similar coverage on other pages for activity, liquidity, leverage, valuation, and growth metrics.

Profits vs. Profitability
What's the Difference?

There is an important difference between a company's profits and its profitability.

Profits

Profits are actual monetary value the firm earns in the period. This value appears in currency units.

"For the year 20XX, Grande Corporation earned Net profits (Net income) of $2,612,000."

This is the Income statement bottom line: Net sales revenues less all expenses.

Profitability

Profitability refers to the company's ability to earn, measured as a ratio of profits divided by Net sales revenues.

"For the year 20XX, Grande Corporation reports a Profit margin of 6.4%."

This margin is the ratio of $2,612,000 profits divided by $32, 983, 000 Net sales revenue.

Note that the Income statement measures profits, while profitability metrics, of course, measure profitability.

At the end of each period, analysts consider both kinds of measures when judging a firm's earnings performance. This is because a firm can earn profits, for instance, but still be relatively unprofitable compared to other companies in the same industry. And, the company can be relatively unprofitable compared to other potential uses of the company's assets. 

Owners and potential investors have a keen interest in profitability metrics because they measure a company's ability to earn. Because the company must earn profits in order to survive and grow, company directors, managers, employees, and competitors also have a high interest in company profits and profitability.

Page Top            Contents

 

Seven Popular Profitability Metrics

Those inside the company with access to the firm's accounts could, in principle, calculate new profitability metrics daily, as balances in various accounts change. Outsiders, of course, must wait for the firm's published statements after each reporting period.

At that time, analysts will compare the firm's profitability metrics with industry "best in class" figures, and with the firm's competitors. They will consider not only the current metrics, but also period-to-period trends in these metrics.

Which Metrics Define Profits and Margins?

This article defines and explains three frequently used profit metrics and their associated profitability margins: (1) Gross profit, (2) Operating Profit, and (3) Net Profit.

Three Income statement profits

At the first mention of "earnings," or "income," many people think firstly of "bottom line" Net income (Net profit on sales) as the measure of a company's financial performance for the period. In addition, however, the Income statement contains other "profits" as well:

  • Secondly, the difference between Net sales revenues and Cost of goods sold is the firm's Gross profit.
  • And, thirdly, profit from operations (that is, before taxes and before gains and losses from financial and extraordinary items) is the firm's Operating profit.

Three Income Statement Margins

All three profit lines from the Income statement (Gross profit, Operating profit, and Net profit) can also appear as a percentage of Net sales revenues, that is, as margins. Gross margin, for instance is Gross profit divided by Net sales revenues (see Exhibit 2, below).

Note that margin percentages usually refer to net sales figures. However, when the Income statement does not distinguish between Net sales and Gross sales, the analyst must base margin percentages simply on "Revenues" as the Income statement shows them.

Margins are important performance indicators because they are central to the company's business model. Margins in the business model, that is, show exactly where the company expects to earn and the expected profitability. As a result, Income statement margins show how well the company is meeting its business plan objectives. 

The table in Exhibit 2, below, shows the relationships between a firm's three profits and its three margins. Figures in Exhibit 2 are from the Exhibit 3 Income statement.

Net Sales = 32,983 Margin = Profit / Sales Revenues
Gross Profit = 10,940 Gross Margin = 10,940 / 32,983 = 33.2%
Operating Profit = 3,130 Operating Margin = 3,130 / 32,983 = 9.5%
Net Profit = 3,130 Profit Margin = 2,126 / 32,983 = 6.4%
 

Exhibit 2. Three profits and three margins from the Income statement. Examples in Exhibit 2 use figures from the Exhibit 3 example statement below.

Profitability Metric 1
Gross Profit / Gross Margin

Gross profit is an accounting term for Net sales revenues minus the costs of producing the goods and services sold. These costs have different names, depending on the nature of the firm's business:

  • In firms that manufactures products, the name is Cost of goods sold (COGS) .
  • For companies that sell services, the name is Cost of services.
  • Where firms sell both products and services, the name can be Cost of sales.

The firm's Gross margin is a ratio made of Gross profits divided by Net sales revenues. The result appears as a percentage. Gross margin therefore is thus the profit margin before subtracting most indirect and general costs of doing business. Gross profit and Gross margin, in other words, show the firm's earning ability before factoring in overhead expenses.

Calculating Gross Profit and Gross Margin

Gross profit and Gross margin examples use data from the example Income statement in Exhibit 3 below.

Net sales revenues: $32,983,000
Cost of goods sold: $22,043,000

Gross profit
     = Net sales revenues – Cost of goods sold
     = $32,983,000 – $22,043,000
     = $10,940,000

Gross Margin
      = Gross profit / Net sales revenues
     = $10,940,000 / $32,983,000
     = 33.2%

Using Gross Profits and Gross Margins

A firm can report a healthy Gross profit and Gross margin, and at the same time report poor Operating profits. in that case, the company is producing and selling products efficiently, but it is not operating efficiently in other areas. Inefficiencies might lie, for instance, in general administration, infrastructure support, or research and development. In other words, the company is incurring unacceptable overhead expenses.

A Gross margin using Income statement figures is the company's Gross margin for the period, of course. However, the firm also needs to know actual Gross margins for individual product lines and individual products and services. This is because Gross margins for individual products can show, for instance, that some sell at a loss, while others are quite profitable.

Calculating individual product Gross profits and margins normally requires information beyond the firm's public financial statements. For these, the analyst needs access to individual product revenues and product COGS.

Profitability Metric 2
Operating Profit / Operating Margin

Operating profit appears on the Income statement after adding revenues and subtracting expenses for the company's normal operating business. However, Operating profit appears before factoring in other revenues and expenses. As a result, Operating income, does not reflect financial income, financial expenses, extraordinary items, or taxes (except for companies in financial services, where financial income and expenses do contribute to Operating profit).

The Operating margin is a ratio made of Operating profits divided by Net sales revenues. The result usually appears as a percentage. Gross margin therefore is the profit margin after subtracting most indirect and general costs from the firm's normal line of business. 

Calculating Operating Profit and Operating Margin

Operating profit and Operating margin examples use data from the example Income statement in Exhibit 3 below.

From the example Income statement.
     Net sales revenues: $32,983,000
     Cost of goods sold: $22,043,000
     All other operating expenses: $7,810,000

Operating profit
     = Net sales revenues – Cost of goods sold – Operating expenses
     = $32,983,000 – $22,043,000 –  $7,810,000
     = $3,130,000

Operating Margin
     = Operating profit / Net sales revenues
     = $3,130,000 / $32,983,000
     = 9.5%

Using Operating Profit and Operating Margin

Operating profit and Operating margin therefore show company earnings (before taxes) from its normal operating business. For this reason, analysts often look first to Operating profit and margin instead of bottom line Net profit to address questions about the firm's core business: For example;

  • Is the company reaching its objectives for earnings growth?
  • Is the firm's reaching its objectives for earnings growth?
  • How do company margins compare to competitors?

Operating Profit and Operating Margin as Selective Income Metrics

Operating profit and margin, in fact, also belong to another family of metrics that address questions about the firm's core business performance. These metrics are selective earnings metrics. "Selective" here means they derive from a just a few selected items on the Income statement, but not all revenues and expenses. Another familiar earnings metric in this family is EBIT (Earnings before interest and taxes).

Analysts and investors sometimes focus on Operating margin and other selective metrics instead of the bottom line Net profit margin. They do this when revenues and expenses outside the core business impact bottom line Profits enough to misrepresent core business performance. For more on EBIT and other selective earnings metrics and their use, see Earnings Before Interest and Taxes.

Using Bottom Line Net Profit and Net Profit Margin

Moving beyond the focus on core business performance, however, analysts will also compare a company's Operating profit margin with its bottom line Net profit margin. This comparison is especially informative after a period when the company has significant gains or losses from it's financial investments or from "extraordinary"  items.

A company that must reduce employee headcount substantially, for instance, normally incurs large extraordinary expenses for the action. These cover severance packages, outplacement costs, and other expenses that go with laying off employees. The large extraordinary expenses impact bottom line Profit margin but they do not impact Operating profit margin. It is of course possible to have a positive Operating profit, while bottom line Net profit is negative. In such cases, the message to investors can be this:

Yes, the company shows a net loss for the period, but that was the result of one-time extraordinary items. Note especially that Operating profits for the core business remain strong. The firm's prospects for continued growth are therefore excellent."

Profitability Metric 3
Net Profit on Sales / Profit Margin

Net profit (or Net profit on sales)  is the company's reported income after taxes, after operating revenues and expenses, after extraordinary items, and after financial income and expenses.  And, the firm's Profit margin is Net profit as a percentage of Net sales revenues.

Net profit can increase owner value of the company in two ways.

  • Firstly, by adding to retained earnings. This is an equity item on the Balance sheet.
  • Secondly, by going to shareholders as dividends.

The distribution of net profits between dividends and retained earnings is always decided by the Board of directors.

Calculating Net profit on Sales / Profit Margin

The Net profit and Profit margin examples use data from the example Income statement in Exhibit 3 below.

Net sales revenues: $32,983,000
Net expenses:
     Cost of goods sold: $22,043,000
     Operating expenses: $7,810,000
     Financial expense net : $393,000 
     Net taxes:  $958,000
Other net gains:
     Grain from extraordinary item: $347,000 gain

Net profit
     = Net sales revenues – Total expenses + Total other gains
     = $32,983,000 – $31,204,000  +  $347,000
     = $2,126,000

Profit margin
     = Net profit / Net sales revenues
     = $2,126,000 / $32,983,000
     = 6.4%

Metrics With An Investment View

The remaining four profitability metrics take an "investment view." These metrics, that is, compare owner investment costs directly with owner investment returns. 

Note that the four investment metrics presented here (ROA, ROCE, ROE, and EPS) all incorporate an earnings figure in the numerator of a ratio. The earnings figures, of course, represent earnings for specific time period, usually the most recent reporting period.

As a result, the metrics measures the company's earning efficiency for the reporting period.

 

Profitability Metric 4
Return on Total Assets (ROA)

The Return on total assets, or simply Return on assets (ROA) metric is also called "Return on Investment," or ROI for the company.

This ROA or ROI should not be confused with the cash flow metric return on investment, or simple ROI, which compares investment costs to investment returns for a single action or investment.

Calculating Return on Total Assets

Return on Assets ROA examples use data from the Income statement in Exhibit 3 and the example Balance sheet in Exhibit 4, below.

From a given Income statement and Balance sheet, Return on total assets derives in either of two ways with the same result.

ROA Method 1

With the first ROA method, Return on total assets derives simply from Income statement Net profit and from Balance sheet Total assets.

From the sample financial statements below:

Net profit on sales: $2,126,000
Total assets: $22,075,000

Return on total assets
     = Net profit on sales / Total assets
     = $2,126,000 / $22,075,000
     = 9.6%

ROA Method 2

With the second Method, ROA calculates by multiplying the Profit margin on sales (profitability metric 3, above) by Total asset turnover (illustrated in this encyclopedia as an activity and efficiency metric).

This method for deriving ROA, incidentally, is the final output of the DuPont System of analysis—which also names the ROA metric as "Return on Investment" for the company.

From the sample Income statement and Balance sheet below:

Net sales revenues = $32,983,000
Net profit = $2,126,000
Total assets = $22,075,000

Profit margin
     = Net profit / Net sales revenues
     = $2,126,000 / $32,983,000
             = 6.4%

Total asset turnover
     = Net sales revenues / Total assets
     = $32,983,000 / $22,075,000
     = 1.49 total asset turns / year

Return on total assets
            = (Profit Margin on sales) x (total asset turnover) 
             = 6.4% x 1.49
             = 9.6%

Using Return on Total Assets Figures

Return on assets is therefore a measure of "what the company earns" relative to "what it has to work with."

Generally, analysts prefer higher ROA results to lower ROA results. Not surprisingly, however, companies in asset-intensive industries (e.g., transportation, construction, or heavy manufacturing) tend to have low ROA figures, whereas companies in industries that do not require an extensive asset base (possibly financial services or consulting) normally have much higher ROA figures.

A calculated ROA refers of course to the specific reporting period, from which the input data are taken. Analysts and investors evaluating ROA figures will compare the company's ROA to standard ROA levels for the specific industry. And, they will also pay attention to year-to-year changes in a company's ROA.

Profitability Metric 5
Return on Capital Employed (ROCE)

The four "investment" metrics in this section are regarded as measures of efficiency, the ability of a company to earn from its resources. Note especially that ROA above asks what the company earns using its asset base, while ROCE and ROE (this section and the next) ask what the company earns for owners from the Equity base.

The first profitability metric referring to the firm's Equity base is also known as an efficiency metric, Return on capital Employed ROCE. This metric asks specifically asks what the company earns from capital employed. As the example below shows, capital employed involves the equity base, but it is not synonymous with the equity base.

Calculating Return on Capital Employed

For calculating ROCE, the "Return" component is taken as one of the selective measures of income, Earnings before interest and taxes EBIT (mentioned above under Operating profit). In practice, analysts compute EBIT from Income statement line items by starting with Net Income and adding back interest expense and tax expense.

Note the following figures from the Exhibit 3 Income statement below:

Net income (profit): $2,126,000
Interest expense paid: $511,000
Income tax on operations: $958,000
Tax on extraordinary gain: $118,000

"Adding back" interest and taxes to Net income produces the company's EBIT:

The "Return" component of ROCE = EBIT
     = Net Income + interest expense paid
        + Income tax on operations paid+ Tax on extraordinary gain paid 
     = $2,126,000 + $511,000 + 958,000 + $118,000
     = $3,713,000

The "Capital Employed" component of ROCE is commonly defined in several different ways, but usually it is calculated from Balance sheet figures for Total assets and Current liabilities. From the Exhibit 3 Balance sheet below, the following figures will contribute to Capital Employed:

Total assets: $22,075,000
Current liabilities:$3,464,000

From these figures, Capital employed results as:

Capital employed = Total Assets + Total Net Revenues – Current Liabilities
     = $22,983,000  – $3,464,000
     = $19,519,000

Return on Capital Employed ROCE is then the ratio of EBIT to Capital employed;

ROCE = EBIT / (Capital employed)
            = $3,713,000 / $19,519,000
            = 19.02%

Using ROCE Figures

Note that the EBIT figure for ROCE represents earnings performance for a reporting period usually the most recent year. However, the Capital employed input figures (Total assets and Current liabilities) are from the Balance sheet, a "snapshot" of the company's financial position at the end of the reporting period.

Since these latter figures can fluctuate during the period, some analysts maintain that a more realistic measure of earnings efficiency from capital results when using the period's average asset base, and average current liabilities figures instead of the end-of-period figures.

When they use averages instead of end-of-period figures, some people still call the resulting metric ROCE. Others, however, call it Return on average capital employed (ROACE).

ROCE Rule of Thumb

ROCE should in any case be higher than the company's cost of capital—otherwise the company would be seen as losing money. Beyond this, ROCE figures for a given company are most useful for when comparing the company's current ROCE to ROCE figures from earlier periods.

As a result, analysts will look for year to year trends in a company's ROCE, as indicators that the company either is or is not improving its ability earn efficiently from capital.

Profitability Metric 6
Return on Equity (ROE)

Besides the ROCE metric above, another metric makes a simpler and more direct comparison of company "returns" to the Equity base: Return on equity (ROE).

Some analysts consider Return on equity (ROE) the most important of the profitability metrics because it compares the company's returns (Net profit) directly to the value of the company's equities—what the company owns outright. Others, however, reserve the "most important" distinction for the Earnings per share (EPS) metric in the next section.

Reflecting other commonly used names for shareholder equity, the ROE metric also has the names Return on owners investment and Return on net worth.

Calculating Return on Equity ROE

Analysts use two different approaches to computing ROE. Note that the two approaches lead to different numerical results.

  • Firstly, some analysts and investors prefer to calculate ROE using total equities from the Balance sheet and Net profit from the Income statement.  This approach is illustrated below as Simple ROE.
  • Secondly, others prefer to remove the contribution of preferred share dividends and preferred share equities from the calculation. This is because owners of preferred shares have precedence over owners of common shares in two circumstances:
    • Firstly in the payment of dividends.
    • Secondly in payouts in the event of liquidation.
    Preferred ownership therefore represents funds that are not available to common stock owners. This approach to return on equity appears here as Return on common equity.

From the sample Income statement, Balance sheet, and statement of retained earnings below:

Net profit on sales: $2,126,000
Total stockholders equities: $13,137,000

Common stock equities:
      = Total Stockholders equities – preferred share contributed capital:
      = $13,137,000 – $3,798,000
      = $9,339

Preferred share dividends: $33,000

(Simple) Return on equity (ROE)
     = Net profit  / Total stockholders equities
     = $2,126,000  / $13,137,000
     = 16.2%

Return on Common Equity 
     = (Net profit − Preferred dividends) / Common stockholders equities
     =  ($2,126,000 – $33,000) / $9,339 
     = 22.4%

Using Return on Equity Figures

Simple ROE and Return on common equity show directly how the company's earnings compare to the owners investment (shareholders investment). By contrast, ROA  (previous section) shows how earnings compare to the total owners investments plus any asset investments made with borrowed funds.

Because earnings (profits) come from both owner investments (equities) and assets funded by lenders (liabilities), the ROE metric is sensitive to leverage effects. ROA, on the other hand, is not sensitive to leverage because ROA is based on the total asset figure. As a result, ROA pays no attention to the source of funds for assets.

Profitability Metric 7
Earnings Per Share

Some analysts and investors see Earnings per share (EPS) as the most important of the profitability metrics, while others see Return on equity (previous section) as most important. 

In any case, EPS shows directly the returns (profits) the firm delivers for each outstanding share of common stock. Note that EPS is the "E" in an equally important valuation metric, the Price/Earnings ratio (or P/E ratio). 

Note also that published and online EPS reports often label the term EPS(TTM), which is just an indicator that the figure refers to the "Trailing Twelve Months" (previous twelve months).

Earnings per share always refers to earnings per outstanding share of common stock. Preferred shares are excluded from the calculation for the same reason that preferred shareholder equity is sometimes excluded from the ROE calculation (previous section):

  • Owners of preferred shares have precedence over owners of common shares both in the payment of dividends and in payouts in the event of liquidation. Preferred ownership thus represents funds that are not available to common stock owners.
  • To complete the exclusion of preferred share impact on the EPS metric, the earnings figure in the EPS calculation is Net profits less preferred share dividends.

Calculating Earnings per Share EPS

From the sample Income statement (Exhibit 3) and the Statement of retained earnings (Exhibit 5) below:

Net profit on sales: $2,126,000
Preferred share dividends: $33,000

From other information in the company's annual report:

Average common shares outstanding for the year:  800,050 shares

Earnings per share
     = (Net profit – Preferred share dividends) / Average common shares outstanding
      = ($2,126,000 – $33,000) / 800,050
      = $2.62 / share

Using EPS figures

The EPS figure gives Investors a rough idea of the dividends they can expect, when considered along with the company's dividend payment history.

Also, as one of the two components of the valuation metric, price/earnings ratio, EPS helps show how much confidence investors have in the future earnings growth of the company. A high P/E ratio indicates high confidence in future earnings growth.

Analysts predict EPS results near the end of each accounting period, before public companies announce financial results. Often, companies also set expectations for EPS at the same time. When the actual EPS results fall short of the expected EPS values, however, share prices are likely to suffer.

Example Income Statement

The example Income statement in Exhibit 3 provides data for profitability metrics.

Grande Corporation                                   Figures in $1,000's
Income Statement for Year Ended 31 December 20YY   
Revenues
Gross sales revenues
   Less returns & allowances
      Net sales revenues
Cost of goods sold
   Dirct materials
   Direct labor
   Manufacturing Overhead
      Indirect labor
      Depreciation, mfr equipment
      Other mfr overhead
      Net mfr overhead
         Net cost of goods sold
Gross Profit








5,263
360
  4,000


33,329
    346


6,320
  6,100




 9,623



32,983








 22,043
 10,940
Operating Expenses
Selling expenses

   Sales salaries
   Warranty expenses
   Depreciation, Store equip
   Other selling expenses
          Total selling expenses
General & Admin expenses
   Administrative salaries
   Rent expenses
   Depreciation, computers
   Other general & admin expenses
      Total general & admin exp
           Total operating expenses
Operating Income Before Taxes
  

  4,200
  730
  120
   972


1,229
180
179
   200






6,022





  1,788













  7,810
  3,130
Financial revenue & Expenses
  Revenue from investments
      Less interest expense
      Net financial gain (expense)
Income before tax & ext items
  Less income tax on operations
    Income before extraordinary items
 



118
  511



  (393)
 2,737
  958
1,779
Extraordinary Items
   Sale of land
   Less initial cost
      Net gain on sale of land
      Less income tax on gain
         Extraord items after tax
 
610
  145



465
  118





  347
Net Income (Profit)       2,126
 

Exhibit 3. Example Income statement. This statement provides data for profits, margins, and other profitability metrics.

Example Balance Sheet

Profitability metrics with an "investment view" use data from the Income statement in Exhibit 3 above and the example Balance sheet in Exhibit 4, below.

Grande Corporation                                   Figures in $1,000's
Balance Sheet at 31 December 20YY   
ASSETS
Current Assets
   Cash
   Short term investments
   Accounts Receivable
      Less allowance doubtful accts
      Net accounts receivable
   Notes receivable short term
   Inventories
      Raw materials
      Work in progress
      Finished goods/merchandise
      Operating & office supplies
            Total Inventories
   Prepaid exp, insurance, def taxes
          Total Current Assets




1,969
   137



    611
1,692
3,664
      19


1,369
  137


1,832
     20





5,986
  265
















9,609
Long Term Investments and Funds
   Common stock held
   Preferred stock held
   Bonds Held / Sinking funds
   Other Long Term Investments
          Total Long Term Investments
    
  493
  184
  364
  419





1,460
Property, Plant & Equipment
   Factory Manufacturing Equipment
      Less accumulated depreciation
      Net factory mfr equipment
   Store Equip / Selling Assets
      Less accumulated depreciation
      Net store/selling equipment
   Computer systems
      Less accumulated depreciation
      Net computer systems
           Total Property, Plant & Equip
 
5,983
 2,782

5,456
 1,292

4,721
 2,370




3,201

4,164


  2,351










9,716
Intangible Assets
   Copyrights
   Trademarks and Patents
   Goodwill
          Total Intangible Assets
    
1,014
108
  100




1,460
Other Assets
                    Total Assets
         68
22,075
LIABILITIES
Current Liabilities
   Accounts payable
   Notes payable, short term
   Current portion of long term debt
   Accrued expenses, Interest payable
   Unearned revenues
   Taxes payable Other withholding
          Total Current Liabilities



 1,642
    912
    349
     146
     274
    141








3,464
Long Term Liabilities
   Bank notes payable
   Bonds payable, other LT liabilities
          Total Long Term Liabilities
                    Total Liabilities
     
912
 4,562



 5,474
8938
OWNERS EQUITY
Contributed Capital
   Preferred stock
   Common stock
   Contributed capital excess of par
          Total Contributed Capital

Retained Earnings
          Total Owners Equity


3,798
4,184
 1,457





9,439

 3,698








13,137
          Total Liabilities and Equities
    22,075
 

Exhibit 4. Example Balance sheet with data for finding profitability metrics with an investment view.

Example Statement of Retained Earnings

This example Statement of retained earnings in Exhibit 5 provides data for the profitability metric Earnings per Share (EPS).

Grande Corporation                                   Figures in $1,000's
Statement of Retained Earnings for year ending 31 Dec 20YY

Beginning balance
   Retained Earnings 1 Jan 20YY
Add net income for fiscal year 20YY
   Total
   Less dividends declared & paid FY 20YY
      Dividends paid on preferred stock
      Dividends paid on common stock
             Total dividends deducted


2,372   2,126


(33)
  (101)



4,498



  (134)
Retained Earnings balance 31 Dec 20YY

  4,364
 

Exhibit 5. Example Retained Earnings statement with data for the Earnings per share (EPS) metric.

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